COVID-19 Notice

We have decided to close down tourism in Gorongosa National Park until further notice.  We want to play our part in reducing movement and transmission of this disease that has the potential to profoundly affect the communities surrounding the Park. 

By Car

Driving by land across Africa can be a rewarding travelling experience and we are here to help you on your journey.

 

Things to know about driving in Mozambique:

  • Seat belts are mandatory for all passengers
  • Use of a mobile phone is not permitted while driving
  • Speed limits are strictly enforced and police speed checks are common.
  • Insurance certificate of the vehicle is mandatory
  • You must carry a Temporary Import Permit for your foreign vehicle. You will get this at the border crossing.
  • All vehicles must be equipped with 2 warning hazard triangles and a reflective jacket
  • You must carry an international drivers license
  • It is safest to drive during daylight – between 6am and 6pm.
  • In Mozambique, cars drive on the left side of the road
  • Note: There are many Fuel stations en route throughout central Mozambique, except for the road from Vilanculos to Inchope. The distance is approximately 400km with limited fuel stations.

Driving from South Africa / Maputo

There are four border crossings between South Africa and Mozambique. The main border crossing is the Lebombo border (known as Ressano Garcia on the Mozambique side), on the N4 (SA) / EN4 (Mozambique) that links Johannesburg and Maputo. See more border information below.

Lebombo Border to Maputo: From the main border crossing of Lebombo,drive 80 km on the EN4 – a high-quality tar road – to Maputo. You will cross two toll plazas between the border and Maputo. In Maputo, take the EN2 toward the EN1. There are plenty of gas stations and restaurants in Maputo if you need to refuel.

Maputo to XaiXai: In Maputo, take the EN1 north and drive 220 km to XaiXai. In the town of XaiXai you’ll find several gas stations, restaurants, banks and a central market. If you’re looking to stop over for a night, the lovely XaiXai beach is only 12 km from town.
XaiXai to Maxixe: Continue on EN1 north anddrive 255km to Maxixe. Maxixe is a bustling town with plenty of small shops, restaurants, and outdoor markets. You can also find banks and gas stations here. If you’re looking to stop at the popular beach destination of Praia do Tofo, you will need to turn off the EN1 approximately 25 kilometers before Maxixe onto EN101 (Av. de Maguiguana) and continue 50 km toward Inhambane. In Inhambane, follow signs for Tofo Beach and the road will turn from tar to dirt/sand as you approach Tofo. Here you can enjoy snorkeling or scuba diving with whale sharks and other tropical marine life.

Maxixe to Vilanculos: Continue on EN1 north and drive 244km to Vilanculos. If you would like to check out one of the most popular beach resorts in Mozambique, just turn off the EN1 when you see a prominent sign for Vilanculos. The beach is only 18km off the highway. Here you can stay in a variety of accommodations – from high-end beachfrontresorts to rustic backpacker hostels. You can do beach activities on the mainland or do day and overnight trips to the Bazaruto Archipelago. This is a good place to stock up on fuel and other amenities as there may not be any reliable gas stations between here and Inchope. If you will be self-catering, this is the best place to do major grocery shopping, as there are only local markets near Gorongosa.

Vilanculos to Inchope: Drive back to the EN1 and head north for 403km toward Inchope. The first major landmark you will cross is a large bridge over the Save River. The tar road to Inchope is not well maintained in some areas and you have to be very careful to drive slowly and avoid potholes. You will pass through the small town of Muxungue where vendors sell the fruit and vegetables that are in season. You will arrive at the town of Inchope where Mozambique’s major highways, the EN1 and the EN6, intersect. There are many fuel stations throughout central Mozambique, except for the road from Vilankulos to Inchope. The distance is approximately 400km with limited fuel stations.

Inchope to Gorongosa National Park: Go straight through the intersection, continuing on the EN1 for 42km. About a kilometer down the road on the left side, there is a BP gas station where you can refuel. Be sure to fill your tank as there is no fuel for sale inside Gorongosa National Park. As you continue on the EN1, you will cross a bridgeover the Pungue River – the views are fantastic! Continue on until you see a large sign for Gorongosa National Park – turn right onto the dirt road. Continue on the graded dirt road for 11 km until you reach the park entrance gate.Now your safari begins! Continue on the road inside the park for 18km and watch for sable antelope, bushbuck, and baboons as you make your way to the reception desk at Girassol Gorongosa Lodge and Safari where you will pay your park entrance fees and get information on the park.

Driving from Zimbabwe

The most commonly travelled border crossing between Zimbabwe and Mozambique is the Machipanda border crossing just east of Mutare on the A3 (Zimbabwe side) / EN6 (Mozambique side). At the border crossing, expect to show your passport, car registration papers, and pay a border crossing fee. Your vehicle may be inspected at the request of the border guards. You may be required to purchase temporary car insurance to cover your car while driving in Mozambique.

 

Machipanda Border to Chimoio: From the Machipanda order crossing, drive 85km on the EN6 – a high-quality tar road – to Chimoio. Chimoio is the closest large town to Gorongosa and is a good place to stock up on supplies if you are self-catering in Gorongosa. As you exit Chimoio on the EN6, there is a ShopRite grocery store where you can get all the supplies you may need. There is also a gas station conveniently located next to the ShopRite.

Chimoio to Inchope: Continue on the EN6
for 68km until you reach the town of Inchope where Mozambique’s major highways, the EN1 and the EN6, intersect. Turn Left on the EN1 toward Gorongosa National Park.

Inchope to Gorongosa National Park: Continue on the EN1 for 42km. About a kilometer down the road on the left side, there is a BP gas station where you can refuel if you didn’t fill up in Chimoio. Be sure to fill up extra fuel canisters as there is no fuel for sale inside Gorongosa National Park. As you continue on the EN1, you will cross a bridge over the Pungue River – the views are fantastic! Continue on until you see a large sign for Gorongosa National Park – turn right onto the dirt road. Continue on the graded dirt road for 11km until you reach the park entrance gate. Now your Safari begins! Continue on the road inside the park for 18km and watch for sable antelope, bushbuck, and baboons as you make your way to the reception desk at Girassol Gorongosa Lodge and Safari. Here you will pay your park entrance fees and get information on the Park.

Driving From Zimbabwe

Driving From Zimbabwe

The most commonly travelled border crossing between Zimbabwe and Mozambique is the Machipanda border crossing just east of Mutare on the A3 (Zimbabwe side) / EN6 (Mozambique side). At the border crossing, expect to show your passport, car registration papers, and pay a border crossing fee. Your vehicle may be inspected at the request of the border guards. You may be required to purchase temporary car insurance to cover your car while driving in Mozambique.

 

Machipanda Border to Chimoio: From the Machipanda order crossing, drive 85km on the EN6 – a high-quality tar road – to Chimoio. Chimoio is the closest large town to Gorongosa and is a good place to stock up on supplies if you are self-catering in Gorongosa. As you exit Chimoio on the EN6, there is a ShopRite grocery store where you can get all the supplies you may need. There is also a gas station conveniently located next to the ShopRite.

Chimoio to Inchope: Continue on the EN6
for 68km until you reach the town of Inchope where Mozambique’s major highways, the EN1 and the EN6, intersect. Turn Left on the EN1 toward Gorongosa National Park.

Inchope to Gorongosa National Park: Continue on the EN1 for 42km. About a kilometer down the road on the left side, there is a BP gas station where you can refuel if you didn’t fill up in Chimoio. Be sure to fill up extra fuel canisters as there is no fuel for sale inside Gorongosa National Park. As you continue on the EN1, you will cross a bridge over the Pungue River – the views are fantastic! Continue on until you see a large sign for Gorongosa National Park – turn right onto the dirt road. Continue on the graded dirt road for 11km until you reach the park entrance gate. Now your Safari begins! Continue on the road inside the park for 18km and watch for sable antelope, bushbuck, and baboons as you make your way to the reception desk at Girassol Gorongosa Lodge and Safari. Here you will pay your park entrance fees and get information on the Park.

Driving From South Africa / Maputo

Driving From South Africa / Maputo

There are four border crossings between South Africa and Mozambique. The main border crossing is the Lebombo border (known as Ressano Garcia on the Mozambique side), on the N4 (SA) / EN4 (Mozambique) that links Johannesburg and Maputo. See more border information below.

Lebombo Border to Maputo: From the main border crossing of Lebombo,drive 80 km on the EN4 – a high-quality tar road – to Maputo. You will cross two toll plazas between the border and Maputo. In Maputo, take the EN2 toward the EN1. There are plenty of gas stations and restaurants in Maputo if you need to refuel.

Maputo to XaiXai: In Maputo, take the EN1 north and drive 220 km to XaiXai. In the town of XaiXai you’ll find several gas stations, restaurants, banks and a central market. If you’re looking to stop over for a night, the lovely XaiXai beach is only 12 km from town.
XaiXai to Maxixe: Continue on EN1 north anddrive 255km to Maxixe. Maxixe is a bustling town with plenty of small shops, restaurants, and outdoor markets. You can also find banks and gas stations here. If you’re looking to stop at the popular beach destination of Praia do Tofo, you will need to turn off the EN1 approximately 25 kilometers before Maxixe onto EN101 (Av. de Maguiguana) and continue 50 km toward Inhambane. In Inhambane, follow signs for Tofo Beach and the road will turn from tar to dirt/sand as you approach Tofo. Here you can enjoy snorkeling or scuba diving with whale sharks and other tropical marine life.

Maxixe to Vilanculos: Continue on EN1 north and drive 244km to Vilanculos. If you would like to check out one of the most popular beach resorts in Mozambique, just turn off the EN1 when you see a prominent sign for Vilanculos. The beach is only 18km off the highway. Here you can stay in a variety of accommodations – from high-end beachfrontresorts to rustic backpacker hostels. You can do beach activities on the mainland or do day and overnight trips to the Bazaruto Archipelago. This is a good place to stock up on fuel and other amenities as there may not be any reliable gas stations between here and Inchope. If you will be self-catering, this is the best place to do major grocery shopping, as there are only local markets near Gorongosa.

Vilanculos to Inchope: Drive back to the EN1 and head north for 403km toward Inchope. The first major landmark you will cross is a large bridge over the Save River. The tar road to Inchope is not well maintained in some areas and you have to be very careful to drive slowly and avoid potholes. You will pass through the small town of Muxungue where vendors sell the fruit and vegetables that are in season. You will arrive at the town of Inchope where Mozambique’s major highways, the EN1 and the EN6, intersect. There are many fuel stations throughout central Mozambique, except for the road from Vilankulos to Inchope. The distance is approximately 400km with limited fuel stations.

Inchope to Gorongosa National Park: Go straight through the intersection, continuing on the EN1 for 42km. About a kilometer down the road on the left side, there is a BP gas station where you can refuel. Be sure to fill your tank as there is no fuel for sale inside Gorongosa National Park. As you continue on the EN1, you will cross a bridgeover the Pungue River – the views are fantastic! Continue on until you see a large sign for Gorongosa National Park – turn right onto the dirt road. Continue on the graded dirt road for 11 km until you reach the park entrance gate.Now your safari begins! Continue on the road inside the park for 18km and watch for sable antelope, bushbuck, and baboons as you make your way to the reception desk at Girassol Gorongosa Lodge and Safari where you will pay your park entrance fees and get information on the park.

Things to know about driving in Mozambique

Driving by land across Africa can be a rewarding travelling experience and we are here to help you on your journey.

Things to know about driving in Mozambique:

  • Seat belts are mandatory for all passengers
  • Use of a mobile phone is not permitted while driving
  • Speed limits are strictly enforced and police speed checks are common.
  • Insurance certificate of the vehicle is mandatory
  • You must carry a Temporary Import Permit for your foreign vehicle. You will get this at the border crossing.
  • All vehicles must be equipped with 2 warning hazard triangles and a reflective jacket
  • You must carry an international drivers license
  • It is safest to drive during daylight – between 6am and 6pm.
  • In Mozambique, cars drive on the left side of the road
  • Note: There are many Fuel stations en route throughout central Mozambique, except for the road from Vilanculos to Inchope. The distance is approximately 400km with limited fuel stations.

Tracks4Africa is a great resource for self-drivers. It’s a community generated travel map of Africa where anyone can add information along their route for others to benefit from. On their website you will find:

An online map of Africa with landmarks regularly updated by users, a downloadable map of Mozambique for your GPS device, and a foldable paper map

Our Mission

Our Mission

Advance an integrated multi-partner approach to conservation and to people-centred development. The Gorongosa Project protects the Park’s biodiversity and ecosystem services and unlocks its economic potential for the community inhabitants of the Gorongosa Buffer Zone, Sofala Province, Mozambique and further afield.

Our Vision

A thriving, biodiversity-rich, Greater Gorongosa conservation landscape, which supports Sofala Province as an engine for resilient and sustainable development enabling nature experiences and wellbeing for its people, enriching all of Mozambique and the world.

A Park for Peace

On 1 August, 2019 a historic ceremony was held in Gorongosa to celebrate the Cessation of Hostilities Accord between the leaders of the Government of Mozambique and the opposition Renamo Party. The accord established Gorongosa National Park (GNP) as a ‘Park for Peace’, delivering human development to the communities that share the greater landscape.